Thursday, March 19, 2020

How to Easily Grow Silver Crystals

How to Easily Grow Silver Crystals Silver crystals are beautiful and easily grown metal crystals. You can watch crystal growth under a microscope or let the crystals grow overnight for larger crystals. Directions Suspend a piece of copper wire in 0.1M silver nitrate in a test tube. If you coil the wire you will get high surface area and more visible growth.Place the tube in a darkened location. Try to avoid high-traffic (high-vibration) areas.Crystals should be visible to the naked eye on the copper wire after about an hour, but larger crystals and noticeable blue coloration of liquid will occur overnight.ORPlace a drop of mercury in a test tube and add 5-10 ml 0.1M silver nitrate.Allow the tube to stand undisturbed in a dark location for 1-2 days. Crystals will grow on the surface of the mercury. Tips It is easy to watch crystals form on a copper wire under a microscope. The heat of the microscope light will cause crystals to form very quickly.AÂ  displacement reaction is responsible for crystal formation: 2Ag Cu → Cu2 2Ag Materials Needed 0.1M Silver NitrateTest TubeCopper Wire or Mercury

Monday, March 2, 2020

Alaric - Formation of the Gothic Kingdom Timeline

Alaric - Formation of the Gothic Kingdom Timeline Alaric Sacks Rome | Alaric Timeline Alaric Before 395: Alaric, a Gothic king [see Visigoths Timeline], had no territory or power base beyond his soldiers, but he was leader of the Goths for 15 years. When he died, his brother-in-law took over. When he died, Walla, and then, Theoderic ruled the Goths, but by then the Gothic king finally had a physical territory over which to rule. One of the historical sources, Claudian, says Alaric confronted the Emperor Theodosius at the Hebrus River in 391, but Alaric didnt come into prominence until 4 years later, in 395, when Stilicho sent Alaric and auxiliary troops who had served in the Battle of the Frigidus to the Eastern Empire. 395-397: The historian Zosimus claims Alaric, upset that he lacked a proper military title, marched on Constantinople to try to get it. According to Claudian, Rufinus, (de facto head of the Eastern Empire at the moment) bribed Alaric with Balkan provinces to sack, instead. Looting, Alaric advanced through the Balkans and via Thermopylae into Greece. In 397, Stilicho led naval forces against Alaric, forcing the Gothic troops to Epirus. This act provoked Rufinus, so he persuaded eastern Emperor Arcadius to declare Stilicho a public enemy. He withdrew and Alaric received a military position, perhaps magister militum per Illyricum. 401-402: Between then and 401, nothing is heard of Alaric. Gainas, a Gothic military leader under Theodosius, went in and out of favor so that Alaric thought his Goths would be better off elsewhere. They set off for the Western Empire, arriving at the Alps on November 18. Alaric threatened to invade Italy, and then carried through. He fought against Stilicho at Pollentia (map ), on Easter in 402. Stilicho won, took Alarics loot, his wife, and his children. The two sides signed a truce and Alaric withdrew from Italy, but soon Stilicho claimed Alaric had violated the terms, so they fought in the summer of 402 at Verona. 402-405: Although the battle was indecisive, Alaric withdrew to the Balkans, where he stayed until 404 or 405 when Stilicho granted him the office of magister militum for the West. In 405, Alarics people went to Epirus. This, again, upset the Eastern Empire who saw it as preparation for an invasion of Illyricum (map ). 407: Alaric marched to Noricum (Austria) where he demanded protection money what was probably enough to repay his losses at Pollentia in return for not invading Italy. Silicho, who wanted Alarics help elsewhere, persuaded Emperor Honorius and the Roman Senate to pay. 408: Arcadius died in May. Stilicho and Honorius planned to go East to tend to the succession, but Honorius magister officiorum, Olympius, persuaded Honorius that Stilicho was planning a coup. Stilicho was executed on August 22. Olympius refused to honor Stilichos bargain. Alaric next demanded gold and a hostage exchange, but when Honorius refused, Alaric marched on Rome and put the city under siege. There he was joined by veterans of other barbarian battles. The Romans feared starvation, so they promised to send an embassy to Honorius (in Rimini) to convince him to settle with Alaric. 409: The imperial legation met the Romans. Alaric demanded money, grain (it wasnt just the Romans who were hungry) and the top military office, magisterium utriusque militiae which post Stilicho had held. The imperials conceded money and grain, but not the title, so Alaric marched on Rome, again. Alaric made two more attempts with smaller demands, but was rebuffed, so Alaric set up his second siege of Rome, but with a difference. He also set up a usurper, Priscus Attalus, in December. The historian Olympiodorus says Attalus gave Alaric his title, but rejected his advice. 410: Alaric deposed Attalus and then took his troops near Ravenna to negotiate with Honorius, but he was attacked by a Gothic general, Sarus. Alaric took this as a token of Honorius bad faith, so he marched on Rome, again. This was the major sack of Rome mentioned in all the history books. Alaric and his men sacked the city for 3 days, ending on August 27. [See Procopius.] Along with their plunder, the Goths took Honorius sister, Galla Placidia, when they left. The Goths still didnt have a home and before they acquired one, Alaric died of a fever very soon after the sacking, at Consentia. 411: Alarics brother-in-law Athaulf marched the Goths into southern Gaul. In 415, Athaulf married Galla Placidia, but the new western magister utriusque militiae, Constantius, starved the Goths out, anyway. After Athaulf was assassinated, the new Gothic king, Walla, made peace with Constantius in exchange for food. Galla Placidia married Constantius, producing a son Valentinian (III) in 419. Wallas men, now in the Roman army, cleared the Iberian peninsula of Vandals, Alans, and Sueves. In 418 Constantius settled Wallas Goths in Aquitaine, Gaul. The Goths in Aquitaine were the 1st autonomous barbarian kingdom inside the Empire. Source Irene Hahns Review of Michael Kulikowskis Romes Gothic Wars: From the Third Century to Alaric (Key Conflicts of Classical Antiquity. Take the Alaric Quiz.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Professional future Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Professional future - Assignment Example In making application for the course I have discovered that there are set of laws which must be all followed to absorb into the course. One is that you have to be a registered nurse. Second is that you must be a practicing registered nursing student with a nursing degree. Thirdly, you must complete the CNRN certification application and paid a specific fee before submitting the copies to the concerned individuals. Individuals who attain this certification can work in a number of places, including hospitals, health care clinics, brain injury units and intensive rehabilitation unit (Carpenito & Fry, 2014). I will begin my course or individual study of my future career of being a registered Nuero-registered nurse sometimes during may next year. This will form one of my best moments in life as I will be sure that my dreams are coming true and this will be after my application for neuroscience nursing in an institution in Chicago (McKinney,

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Figurative Language versus Literal Language Essay - 2

Figurative Language versus Literal Language - Essay Example The American language is a living, breathing, and ever evolving language. As such, it is composed of words, phrases, and sentences that find their origins in the most ancient of historical times with its meaning evolving over the years as people use the word for various purposes and to invoke various meanings.There can be figurative uses for the word, or even literal uses which manage to change the context of the word regardless of the word etymology. This paper will look into the etymology and meaning of 10 of the most popular words used in the American English language. The discussion will be started off by looking into the history and meaning of the word Idiom. The word Idiom first came into play in 1580 and was meant to connote a "form of speech peculiar to a people or place â€Å". Although Latin in origin from the word â€Å"idioma†, the modern form of the word actually comes from the French original idiome. (Online Etymology Dictionary) Idioma therefore describes a a l anguage, dialect, or style of speaking that is unique to a particular set of people. It's actual definition is that of a noun that â€Å"an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meaning of its constituents† (dictionary.com). Idioms are therefore cultural in nature (Garland, â€Å"Oh Idioms: Overused, Amusing, and Often Confusing) and should not be confused wih the figurative metaphors that uses an image for comparison purposes, it is also not a simile or a hyperbole. (Garland, â€Å"Oh Idioms: Overused, Amusing, and Often Confusing).... (Online Etymology Dictionary). It is often confused with the word analysis is the word that is used to describe the process of comparing two things. An example of the use of the word Analogy is â€Å"The analogy between the heart and a pump†. (dictionary.com) Now we come to the word Metaphor which is a â€Å"figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance† (dictionary.com). The origin of the word dates back to the 1530's from the Latin word Metaphora which meant â€Å"a transfer†, specially of one word to a different word (dictionary.com). A sample of a metaphor is â€Å"Our fortress is God†. Therefore a metaphor cannot be confused with a simile. A Simile on the other hand is a â€Å"figure of speech where two unlike things are compared†. It is the opposite of a metaphor and dates back to 1393 when the word simile was first used to describe like things. An exam ple of a metaphor would be â€Å"She is like a rose.† Now a Cliche, is a â€Å"trite, stereotyoed expression that usually expresses a popular or common thought of idea that has lost originality due to overuse.† (dictionary.com) An example of a cliche would be â€Å"strong as an ox†. It is most often confused with the word stereotype. An Amphiboly is â€Å"an ambuguity of speech, especially from uncertainty of the grammatical construction rather than that of the meaning of the words†. It seems to describe nonsensical sentences such as â€Å"The Duke yet lives that Harry shall depose†. (dictionary.com) In our modern era of speech, new words have been coined to describe the actions of people over the internet. One such word is Flame Word

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Volcanoes and Earth :: Geology

VOLCANOES AND THE EARTH SYSTEM EFFECTS OF VOLCANIC GASES Most of the gases in the atmosphere originally come from the Earth's interior. Gases within magma are dissolved because of high pressures beneath the earth's surface, but reduced pressure at the surface allows dissolved gases to expand and escape. When a volcano erupts, gases such as sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, chlorine, argon, sulfur, carbon monoxide, fluorine, and water vapor escape into the atmosphere. Although many of the gases emitted during a volcanic eruption can be helpful to the earth, a lot of the gases can be disruptive to the earth system. Quite possibly the only gas that is generally better for the atmosphere than the rest of the gases is water vapor. Although it is a greenhouse gas, water vapor from volcanic eruptions adds to the earth's water supply. Sulfur dioxide emitted from volcanic eruptions is one of the main chemical compounds responsible for the earth's already dangerous acid rain problem. Carbon dioxide is universally considered one of the most dangerous greenhouse gases on the planet. Increases in this gas have been proven to cause an increase in the average temperature of the Earth. Global warming can result in the melting of polar ice caps. This melting causes the rising of ocean levels, which can flood coastal cities. Volcanoes contribute about 110 million tons of carbon dioxide per year. Although this can be viewed as a bad problem for the ever-increasing problem of global warming, volcanoes can actually cause the opposite effect. Volcanoes can help cool the earth's surface by forming sulfuric acid aerosols that reflect the sun's rays. This is contradicted though by the carbon dioxide that adds to the greenhouse effect. Weather patterns can be disrupted by sulfur dioxide. In a reaction involving the sun and water vapor, sulfur dioxide can turn into sulfuric acid. This sulfuric acid can combine with rain and cause acid rain to fall to earth. Sulfuric aerosol remains in the air long after the volcano has erupted. These aerosols can last for years and studies have shown a strong correlation between periods of long-term sulfuric aerosol layers in the atmosphere and a resulting temperature decrease during those same years. Without replenishment, the sulfuric acid aerosol layer around the earth is gradually depleted, but it is renewed by each eruption rich in sulfur dioxide. This was determined after the eruptions of such volcanoes as El Chichon in Mexico and Mt. Volcanoes and Earth :: Geology VOLCANOES AND THE EARTH SYSTEM EFFECTS OF VOLCANIC GASES Most of the gases in the atmosphere originally come from the Earth's interior. Gases within magma are dissolved because of high pressures beneath the earth's surface, but reduced pressure at the surface allows dissolved gases to expand and escape. When a volcano erupts, gases such as sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, chlorine, argon, sulfur, carbon monoxide, fluorine, and water vapor escape into the atmosphere. Although many of the gases emitted during a volcanic eruption can be helpful to the earth, a lot of the gases can be disruptive to the earth system. Quite possibly the only gas that is generally better for the atmosphere than the rest of the gases is water vapor. Although it is a greenhouse gas, water vapor from volcanic eruptions adds to the earth's water supply. Sulfur dioxide emitted from volcanic eruptions is one of the main chemical compounds responsible for the earth's already dangerous acid rain problem. Carbon dioxide is universally considered one of the most dangerous greenhouse gases on the planet. Increases in this gas have been proven to cause an increase in the average temperature of the Earth. Global warming can result in the melting of polar ice caps. This melting causes the rising of ocean levels, which can flood coastal cities. Volcanoes contribute about 110 million tons of carbon dioxide per year. Although this can be viewed as a bad problem for the ever-increasing problem of global warming, volcanoes can actually cause the opposite effect. Volcanoes can help cool the earth's surface by forming sulfuric acid aerosols that reflect the sun's rays. This is contradicted though by the carbon dioxide that adds to the greenhouse effect. Weather patterns can be disrupted by sulfur dioxide. In a reaction involving the sun and water vapor, sulfur dioxide can turn into sulfuric acid. This sulfuric acid can combine with rain and cause acid rain to fall to earth. Sulfuric aerosol remains in the air long after the volcano has erupted. These aerosols can last for years and studies have shown a strong correlation between periods of long-term sulfuric aerosol layers in the atmosphere and a resulting temperature decrease during those same years. Without replenishment, the sulfuric acid aerosol layer around the earth is gradually depleted, but it is renewed by each eruption rich in sulfur dioxide. This was determined after the eruptions of such volcanoes as El Chichon in Mexico and Mt.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Outline and Evaluate the Reasons for the Growing Popularity Essay

Outline and evaluate the reasons for the growing popularity of alternative medicine Alternative medicine is a term that is used to describe medical practices that are different from accepted forms and is used instead of orthodox medicine (Hunt and Lightly, 1999). This term was given to these types of medical practices by the bio-medical model which reflects their power. However, recently it has been become ‘Complementary’ which shows the increasing acceptance of this type of medicine; this now marks a shift from seeing alternatives as in opposition to modern medicine to recognising that they can support orthodox treatment. This type of medicine has a Holistic approach, meaning that it treats the mind as well as the body, unlike the bio-medical model which could be a reason as to why more and more people use certain forms of complementary medicine. Alternative medicine has always been popular in Eastern societies; for example, treatments like Fire Cupping originate from China and over time have becoming increasingly popular in the West. According to a study in 2007, Britons spent ? 91 million on alternative medicine in that year alone and has been suggested that that figure has gone up by 32% in the past five years. Another reason as to why this form of medicine has become largely more popular in Western societies is that GPs and hospitals will often refer people to them if they feel that the bio-medical model can’t help them. Similarly, the NHS will refer to this form of medicine as ‘Complementary’, which shows that they no longer see it as a threat to their form of health care. According to Sharma (1992) the most popular forms on Complementary medicine are Herbalism, Osteopathy and Homeopathy. This could be down to the fact that these ones are the most successful in their treatment, or on the other hand it could be that celebrities have made it into some form of ‘Popular Culture’ in which the masses feel they should also try out. There are a significant amount of reasons as to why there has been a growth in the popularity of alternative/complementary medicine over the last decade. According to Bivins (2007) the popularity of bio-medicine suited a population under permanent threat of infectious diseases. Whereas today, patients’ needs have changed due to the fact that certain chronic conditions have risen which has in turn led to disappointment towards industrial medicine as it is shows that orthodox medicine doesn’t give people other options; it is limited in its treatments. Furthermore, industrial medicine is significantly impersonal compared to complementary medicine which could be another reasons as to why people are choosing alternate forms of health care. On the other hand, Hunt and Lightly (1999) suggest that it could be down to the fact that there are a growing number of people in the population which simply needs/wants to be different and experiment. Illich would put forward his theory of ‘iatrogenesis’ (when medicine does more harm than good), saying that people are concerned about the unpleasant side-effects of drugs and the interventionist nature of medical practice which has been proven by surveys taken out. Another minor issue could be that people now demand for patient input; regarding complementary medicine, the doctor and the patient talk and together come up with solutions; the patient isn’t treated passive and isn’t talked to. According to Bakx (1991) the decline in the cultural dominance of biomedicine and the medical profession has resulted in the re-emergence of the plurality of alternative approached to health. Stanway would refute this view and suggest that people ‘simply want to experiment’. He would also say that this could be down to philosophical/religious reservations about what is being offered. Orthodox medicine have a ‘body dualism’ approach instead of a Holistic approach in which alternative medicine does take; they take into account everything to do with the patients life, whether that be physical or emotional or psychological problems. However, Coward (1989) would refute both models of health saying that they ‘tend to stress that health problems are individual, both in terms of the causes and the cures’. He would say that this ignores the wider social factors that cause ill health, such as poverty, job-related stress and pollution. He would also say that many of the treatments haven’t been tested in the ways that conventional medicine has, so it hasn’t met the ‘Peer Review criteria’ which therefore brings into account the â€Å"Placebo Affect† suggesting that these treatments make people believe that they are feeling better when actually it is all fake. This suggests that the rising popularity of contemporary medicine is ‘fake’ and that the medicine doesn’t actually do anything, but because people think it does they are using it more and more. He would also state that if people on rely on alternative medicine it could be dangerous in the case of serious diseases like Cancer and AIDS where conventional treatments are more effective. Fulder would agree with Coward here and question whether alternative practitioners are prepared to take sole responsibility for their patients when regarding chronic diseases and whether they would refer them to the bio-medical models’ treatment or keep them in their own hands. According to a survey done by Fulder and Monro, it was suggested that the kind of people who use alternative medicine are more likely to be middle class, female and young to middle-aged. Some would argue that this is because alternative medicine can be expensive, and also because women often go to the doctors more than men they are now turning to complementary treatments in hope that (for example) their period pains, morning sickness etc will be sorted by other forms of medicine. To conclude, there are a number of reasons as to why there is a growing popularity of alternative medicine and there isn’t one clear cut answer.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Hamlet Sadness, Madness, Or Just Misunderstood - 1053 Words

Hamlet: Sadness, Madness, or Just Misunderstood At best, I believe that Act I, Scene II might be one of the most important parts of Hamlet. It prepares any reader with the character’s styling of Hamlet, its importance to the play, its characters, and the logical play on words to show the complexity of Shakespeare’s skills as a playwright. Though, it might be a bit of over-aggrandizing to say that the first Act and second scene could be so crucial. It set the tone of the play for many of the characters and their motives from Claudius, Gertrude, and Hamlet. The Act shows the true nature of many of the characters and where they stand in the apparent and the hidden stance. As the scene begins, we see Claudius come straight out as the antagonist, though not immediately. He (Claudius) begins to establish himself as King of Denmark but it is until Hamlet makes his appearance that we see some of Claudius’s attributes. Claudius shows two faces; one of the grieving brother in mourning for his dead king and then as if the earth isn’t cold on his brother’s grave, he acts calm and professional as King himself showing almost no sadness at all up to entrance of Hamlet in the scene. To move that quickly in emotion, sets the passage and the context as a strongly passionate scene for conflict to come later on. Returning to Claudius, his motion to marry Gertrude and its here we can identify some scheming in the out and open; â€Å"Therefore our sometime sister, now our queen,Show MoreRelatedHamlet And Life Of Pi Compare And Contrast5239 Words   |  21 Pagesclarification on a new age of awareness is apparent in Shakespeare’s heart-rending Hamlet and similarly with Yann Martel courageous narrative Life of Pi, both protagonists have intertwined fiats of struggling in their harsh realities. The innocent perspectives of life and youth that afflict both protagonists characters are explored in both Hamlet and Life of pi. Henceforth, with certain tragic incomprehensi ble events in both Hamlet and Life of Pi it leads the protagonists to enter a spiralling path of terrifyingRead MoreAnalysis Of Hamlet And Life Of Pi5282 Words   |  22 Pages on a new age of awareness is apparent in Shakespeare’s heart-rending Hamlet and similarly with Yann Martel courageous narrative Life of Pi, both protagonists have intertwined fates of struggling with their harsh realities. The innocent perspectives of life and youth that afflict both protagonists characters are explored in both Hamlet and Life of pi. Henceforth, with certain tragic incomprehensible events in both Hamlet and Life of Pi it leads the protagonists to enter a spiralling path ofRead MoreLangston Hughes Research Paper25309 Words   |  102 Pagesfall on the floor and start a fire. Bitter over her failed marriage and tired after a long day at work, Carrie could become irritable and short-tempered. She often scolded Langston, and if he hung his head and didnt respond, she would add, Youre just like Jim Hughes †¦ [hes] a devil on wheels! Then, to salve her conscience over losing her temper, she would take Langston to a movie, where they sat in a segregated section of the balcony. She also took him to the public library, where he discovered